photo credit Brigid McAuliffe

We were laughing in the kitchen the other day, standing together at the sink pitting cherries. Shirley Ela was recalling the days of hairpins, when practically all ladies had and used them, and when they were the pitting tool of choice. Back in the Depression era, people were so careful to waste nothing, and no one bought anything unnecessary. We were laughing about how much faster and easier it is now, to pit the cherries with this scissors-type tool which just cradles a cherry and punches the pit out.

This weekend join us in sharing the immense bounty of cherries! Somehow they are getting even darker, richer, & juicier. They are fabulous.

In a surprise addition (thanks wet cool spring!) we are bringing the seldom seen Ela Family Farms silver-dollar-size apricots to Denver area markets. Sneak in early for a taste 🙂

The story of our food, and taking time for it, adds a richness to our daily lives. In that vein we’d like to share a story which you, as supporters of our farm, are a part of. Have you heard of Slow Food Nations? Slow Food is a global, grassroots organization, founded in 1989 to prevent the disappearance of local food cultures and traditions, counteract the rise of fast life and combat people’s dwindling interest in the food they eat, where it comes from and how our food choices affect the world around us. We participate in this sustainability movement and in your support, so do you.

There’s an event open to all this weekend – we’ll be there! If you’d like to connect with farmers, foodies and families please join us in Larimer Square! We will be part of the Panels and Workshops on Saturday noon-2, part of the Taste Marketplace Sunday afternoon, and collaborating in Meet Your Makers with Haykin Family Cider on Sunday from 4-5. Our Esopus Spitzenburg apple (grown by Thomas Jefferson) is even included in their Ark of Taste!

Shirley Ela picking apricots by feel

photo credit Brigid McAuliffe

photo credit Brigid McAuliffe

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This